Fieldwork 2018 plans in the news

“Fowler set to uncover new species of ankylosaur” Read the full story at The Dickinson Press  

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Molding and casting a dinosaur

Dr. Liz Freedman Fowler is busy molding this fossil slab in the lab – but what is it? All will be revealed later this year, but if you come by the museum and look in the lab, we’ll show you what it is (answer – it’s pretty awesome!). The molding

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Opening a new ankylosaur jacket

This past week we have added a display case next to the laboratory window which showcases some of the recently prepared bones from the new armored dinosaur that we collected in summer 2017. “Ankylomania” is currently being prepared by lab volunteer Destiny (pictured). This photo shows us opening a new

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Augmented Reality Sandbox fully operational!

Our Augmented Reality Sandbox is now fully up and running. We have just installed some new features for you to try, including a “Primordial Earth” mode which shows Earth four and half billion years ago just after it formed: a barren rock complete with volcanoes and lava! If you’ve not

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Feathered dinosaur models in the news

“Museum Center preparing ‘Claws Exhibit’; feathered dinosaurs are the ‘stars'” Read the full story at The Dickinson Press  

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Hello world!

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start writing!

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Hello world!

Welcome to Demo Import Data Sites. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

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Painting the imaginations

Dolphins have a streamlined fusiform body, adapted for fast swimming. The tail fin, called the fluke, is used for propulsion while the pectoral fins, together with the entire tail section, provide directional control. The dorsal fin, in those species that have one, provides stability while swimming. Though varying by species,

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Potter working a piece of clay

Dolphins have a streamlined fusiform body, adapted for fast swimming. The tail fin, called the fluke, is used for propulsion while the pectoral fins, together with the entire tail section, provide directional control. The dorsal fin, in those species that have one, provides stability while swimming. Though varying by species,

Continue reading

Painting the imaginations

Dolphins have a streamlined fusiform body, adapted for fast swimming. The tail fin, called the fluke, is used for propulsion while the pectoral fins, together with the entire tail section, provide directional control. The dorsal fin, in those species that have one, provides stability while swimming. Though varying by species,

Continue reading